Photo
from the wonderful black workshop

from the wonderful black workshop

(Source: theblackworkshop)

Photo
Boris Pasternak was a Russian poet and translator of Shakespeare, among many other authors. He is most famous in the West for his novel, Dr. Zhivago. 
Pasternak managed to survive the insanity of Stalin but just barely. When the KGB was planning to arrest him, Stalin quoted some poetry that Pasternak had translated and told them, “Leave him. He’s a cloud-dweller.”
Not quite. The great novel Pasternak wrote, Dr Zhivago, is really the story of the Soviet Union from before the 1917 revolution to the Second World War. It is an indictment of the stupidity of the Communists and the tragic death of freedom under Stalin and his thugs. Sometimes the ‘cloud-dwellers’ hurl down bolts of lightning.
BBC Radio 4 has a great 5-part reading of The Zhivago Affair by Peter Finn and Petra Couvee. Wonderful.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b048jflr

Boris Pasternak was a Russian poet and translator of Shakespeare, among many other authors. He is most famous in the West for his novel, Dr. Zhivago. 

Pasternak managed to survive the insanity of Stalin but just barely. When the KGB was planning to arrest him, Stalin quoted some poetry that Pasternak had translated and told them, “Leave him. He’s a cloud-dweller.”

Not quite. The great novel Pasternak wrote, Dr Zhivago, is really the story of the Soviet Union from before the 1917 revolution to the Second World War. It is an indictment of the stupidity of the Communists and the tragic death of freedom under Stalin and his thugs. Sometimes the ‘cloud-dwellers’ hurl down bolts of lightning.

BBC Radio 4 has a great 5-part reading of The Zhivago Affair by Peter Finn and Petra Couvee. Wonderful.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b048jflr

Video

The Rolling Stones doing the gentle and melancholy, Wild Horses.

Photo
The little creature in the photo is your best friend. Why? Because plankton provides most of your oxygen. Astonishing, isn’t it?
Aeon magazine profiles Victor Smetacek, a marine biologist with a very big plan to reverse global warming by boosting the number of these tiny oxygen producers:

Much of the oxygen we breathe comes from just one species of cyanobacteria,Prochlorococcus. This species was not even discovered until the 1980s: it is so tiny that millions can fit into a single drop of water and no one had produced a sieve small enough to catch it. The oxygen made by these tiny marine plants dwarfs that produced by the Amazon rainforest and the rest of the world’s woodlands combined. By taking in CO2 and exhaling oxygen, these tiny creatures serve as the planet’s lungs, whose steady breathing is limited only by nutrition.

Smetacek’s plan is audacious: fertilize the ocean with iron sulfide so that more tiny CO2 eaters are created. The huge bloom of plankton would suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and exhale more oxygen, our pal!
A very big idea and a very nice idea but so far, it hasn’t quite worked out. 
http://aeon.co/magazine/nature-and-cosmos/can-tiny-plankton-help-reverse-climate-change/
Microscopy by Wim van Egmond.

The little creature in the photo is your best friend. Why? Because plankton provides most of your oxygen. Astonishing, isn’t it?

Aeon magazine profiles Victor Smetacek, a marine biologist with a very big plan to reverse global warming by boosting the number of these tiny oxygen producers:

Much of the oxygen we breathe comes from just one species of cyanobacteria,Prochlorococcus. This species was not even discovered until the 1980s: it is so tiny that millions can fit into a single drop of water and no one had produced a sieve small enough to catch it. The oxygen made by these tiny marine plants dwarfs that produced by the Amazon rainforest and the rest of the world’s woodlands combined. By taking in CO2 and exhaling oxygen, these tiny creatures serve as the planet’s lungs, whose steady breathing is limited only by nutrition.

Smetacek’s plan is audacious: fertilize the ocean with iron sulfide so that more tiny CO2 eaters are created. The huge bloom of plankton would suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and exhale more oxygen, our pal!

A very big idea and a very nice idea but so far, it hasn’t quite worked out. 

http://aeon.co/magazine/nature-and-cosmos/can-tiny-plankton-help-reverse-climate-change/

Microscopy by Wim van Egmond.

Photo
Interesting review of recent feminist books. As bell hooks says:

feminism is for everyone.

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/32497422-012f-11e4-a938-00144feab7de.html#slide0

Interesting review of recent feminist books. As bell hooks says:

feminism is for everyone.

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/32497422-012f-11e4-a938-00144feab7de.html#slide0

Video

nice little video. a little too precise for me but useful info. with the good line:

Trial and error is your friend here!

Photo
illustration by Fumi Koike
http://fumikoike.blogspot.fr/
http://mmepastel.tumblr.com/post/91580495514/comme-un-trait-dunion-entre-muji-lee-et-lizzy
Video

The wonderful bassist Charlie Haden died yesterday but the great music keeps going!

Photo
World Cup…whatever. But the BBC's coverage online of the penalty kick conclusion of the Netherlands-Costa Rica match is perfect.
The green blur in the photo above is Tim Krul, the Dutch goalkeeper, who was successful in blocking the shot. As a result, the Netherlands won. Krul was put into the game after regulation play, just to handle the penalty shots! Imagine the risk taken by coach Louis van Gaal! He pulls the keeper who has let in zero goals during the game and puts in a new guy whose record blocking penalty kicks in the pro league is 2 stopped out of 20! 
As commentator Alan Shearer said before the result was in:

"It’s a massive call. Tim Krul has faced 20 penalties for Newcastle and saved two… that is not a great record. This is what you get paid for as a manager - you make big, big calls and this is a massive call. It either works for him, or it goes against him."

It worked. And rather than waste several hours watching the game, I recommend the BBC site’s perfect commentary and photos:
http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/football/28180956
Now let me make a familiar complaint against football. When two of the world’s best teams play an entire game and neither team scores a goal…doesn’t that tell you something about the design of the sport? 
It is flawed. And as a result, the match was decided by penalty kicks, which are 50% skill and 50% luck. That’s fine if we’re playing a pick-up game at the park. But in a world-class sport and the ultimate level of skill? Not good enough. Sorry.

World Cup…whatever. But the BBC's coverage online of the penalty kick conclusion of the Netherlands-Costa Rica match is perfect.

The green blur in the photo above is Tim Krul, the Dutch goalkeeper, who was successful in blocking the shot. As a result, the Netherlands won. Krul was put into the game after regulation play, just to handle the penalty shots! Imagine the risk taken by coach Louis van Gaal! He pulls the keeper who has let in zero goals during the game and puts in a new guy whose record blocking penalty kicks in the pro league is 2 stopped out of 20! 

As commentator Alan Shearer said before the result was in:

"It’s a massive call. Tim Krul has faced 20 penalties for Newcastle and saved two… that is not a great record. This is what you get paid for as a manager - you make big, big calls and this is a massive call. It either works for him, or it goes against him."

It worked. And rather than waste several hours watching the game, I recommend the BBC site’s perfect commentary and photos:

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/football/28180956

Now let me make a familiar complaint against football. When two of the world’s best teams play an entire game and neither team scores a goal…doesn’t that tell you something about the design of the sport?

It is flawed. And as a result, the match was decided by penalty kicks, which are 50% skill and 50% luck. That’s fine if we’re playing a pick-up game at the park. But in a world-class sport and the ultimate level of skill? Not good enough. Sorry.

Photo
Red! Yes!

Red! Yes!

(via windwrinkle)